Christian Levis

Christian Levis

Partner

about Christian Levis

Christian Levis is a partner at Lowey Dannenberg, P.C., whose practice focuses on complex class actions. He has extensive experience litigating class actions across various practice areas, including antitrust, commodities, consumer protection, data breach and privacy law. Mr. Levis has litigated against some of the largest corporations in the world and has achieved substantial recoveries on behalf of plaintiffs such as the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (“CalSTRS”), the nation’s largest educator-only pension fund, and the Treasurer of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Notable Cases:

Data Breach: An avid computer programmer with years of experience developing mobile applications, Mr. Levis heads Lowey Dannenberg’s data breach practice group. Mr. Levis currently serves as court appointed co-lead counsel in In re Rutter’s Inc. Data Sec. Breach Litig., Case No. 20-cv-00382 (M.D. Pa.), where he represents a class of consumers allegedly affected by malware installed on Rutter’s payment card system. Mr. Levis is also co-lead counsel for the class of financial institutions allegedly impacted by the breach of convenience store and gas chain Wawa’s payment card system in In re Wawa Data Sec. Litig., Case No. 19-cv-06019 (GEKP) (E.D. Pa.), which is estimated to have compromised over 30 million records. Additionally, Mr. Levis leads the prosecution of Cohen v. Northeast Radiology, P.C., Case No. 20-cv-01202 (VB) (S.D.N.Y.), a class action on behalf of 1.2 million patients impacted when a radiology provider’s servers were allegedly breached.

Bond Rigging: Mr. Levis represents the Treasurer of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as court appointed co-lead counsel in In re GSE Bonds Antitrust Litigation, Case No. 19-cv-1704 (JSR) (S.D.N.Y.) (“GSE Bonds”), a class action against sixteen of the world’s largest banks alleging a conspiracy to fix the prices of debt securities issued by government sponsored entities. To date, Plaintiffs have reached settlements totaling more than $386 million, resulting in a substantial recovery for bond investors nationwide.

Benchmark Manipulation: Mr. Levis played an integral role in several class actions involving the manipulation of IBOR-denominated financial instruments, in which Lowey served as either sole or co-lead counsel. See, e.g., Laydon v. Mizuho Bank, Ltd., Case No. 12-cv-03419 (S.D.N.Y); Sullivan v. Barclays PLC, Case No. 13-cv-02811 (S.D.N.Y.); In re: London Silver Fixing Ltd. Antitrust Litigation, Case No. 14-md-02573 (S.D.N.Y.); Sonterra Capital Master Fund Ltd. v. Credit Suisse Group AG, Case No. 15-cv-871 (S.D.N.Y).  Collectively these actions have resulted in over $820 million in settlements.

Consumer Protection: Mr. Levis is leading the prosecution in several consumer class actions involving emerging technology and consumer privacy issues, including In re Apple Processor Litig., Case No. 18-cv-0147 (N.D. Cal.), a proposed class action against Apple for using allegedly defective central processing units in its devices, and two data privacy actions arising out of the unauthorized recording of consumers by Apple and Google virtual assistants. See Lopez v. Apple, Inc., Case No. 19-cv- 04577 (N.D. Cal.); In re Google Assistant Privacy Litig., Case No. 19-cv-04286 (N.D. Cal.). In appointing Lowey Dannenberg as co-lead counsel in In re Apple Processor Litig., Case No. 18-cv-0147 (N.D. Cal.), ECF No. 40, the court praised Lowey for its “detailed investigation and analysis of the design, manufacture, and operation of the Apple CPUs.”

Other Notable Achievements:

Mr. Levis is a member of the New York State Bar Association’s Committee on Technology and the Legal Profession. Mr. Levis also manages Lowey Dannenberg’s e-discovery infrastructure and is an expert in the use of analytics and technology-assisted document review in large class actions. For example, Mr. Levis recently presented on the “State of eDiscovery During the COVID-19 Pandemic” and has lectured on the use analytics-based workflows in class actions,  presenting “An Analytics Cookbook for Complex Cases” at a leading industry conference after developing a workflow that saved the class in Laydon v. Mizuho Bank, Ltd., Case No. 12-cv-03419 (S.D.N.Y) an estimated $2.5 million. In addition to his e-discovery expertise, Mr. Levis has utilized his computer programming skills to develop custom software to assist clients in identifying potential damages from market manipulation.

Background:

Prior to joining Lowey Dannenberg, P.C., Mr. Levis clerked for the Honorable Jessica R. Mayer in the Superior Court of New Jersey and was involved in several mass tort cases involving pharmaceuticals and medical devices.

Mr. Levis is a graduate of Fordham Law School, were he was the associate editor of the Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal. He also served as the interschool competitions director for the Brendan Moore Trial Advocacy Center, winning two national trial competitions, in addition to an individual best advocate award. In recognition of these accomplishments, Mr. Levis received the Abraham Abramovsky Award for outstanding achievement in trial advocacy in 2012.

Mr. Levis received his undergraduate degrees in Biology and English from New York University, where his research focused on statistical modeling of Tuberculosis infection rates among members of New York City’s homeless population.

He also teaches as an adjunct professor of trial advocacy at Fordham University School of Law.

Recent Publications:

  • Christian Levis, Amanda Fiorilla, Some Credit Unions Have Received Settlements; Should You Take Your Situation to Court?, CU Management, (Mar. 10, 2020), https://www.cumanagement.com/articles/2020/03/recovering-card-losses-after-third-party-breaches.

 

Education:

B.A. New York University (2008), cum laude

J.D. Fordham University School of Law (2012)

Bar/Court Admissions:

New York, New Jersey, United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, District of New Jersey, and the United States Courts of Appeals for the Second and Ninth Circuits